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July 2019 Legislative Update


OPPOSE THE BUCHANAN AMENDMENT TO H.R. 3055

HSC opposes Rep. Vern Buchanan’s (R-FL) proposed Amendment to H.R. 3055. HR 3055 contains the CJS, Agriculture, and Interior appropriations bills. Rep. Buchanan’s amendment would ban funds to issue permits for the import of sport-hunted elephants or lions from Tanzania, Zimbabwe or Zambia. The amendment was approved by the House the week of June 17th.  HSC encourages you to express any opposition to this Amendment to your Congressman and/or Senator. To contact your Representative: https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative; To contact your Senator: https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm.

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE

HSC joined 37 other hunting, fishing, wildlife conservation, and outdoor-recreation-based organizations urging Congress to help address Chronic Wasting Disease. Specifically, HSC requests that Congress advance the following bills out of Committee: 1. H.R. 837 the Chronic Wasting Disease Transmission in Cervidae Study Act, sponsored by Representatives Ralph Abraham (LA) and Marc Veasey (TX). H.R. 837 would help address the issue of a lack of reliable information surrounding CWD. This bill would direct the Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to enter into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study on CWD which will build upon and synthesize prior research on transmission pathways and management strategies. 2. H.R. 1550 the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Act, sponsored by Representatives Ron Kind (WI) and Jim Sensenbrenner (WI). This bill would provide much needed financial resources to state and tribal agencies to enhance surveillance and monitoring efforts, develop and implement management strategies and control methods, and provide funding for additional research on CWD. View the full letter HERE.

SAVES ACT

Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) is planning on reintroducing the SAVES Act (S. 2778). This legislation would amend the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 to include a prohibition on the listing of a living nonnative species as a threatened species or an endangered species, and for other purposes. The Act would prohibit listing a species under the ESA in the United States simply because it was threatened in its country of origin. Such a listing would place exotic species, that may be thriving in the U.S., under the ESA should they be considered threatened or endangered in their native country. To learn more: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/2778/text?r=19&s=1. To voice your support for the SAVES Act: https://www.cruz.senate.gov/?p=form&id=16.

RECOVERING AMERICA’S WILDLIFE ACT (RAWA)

States are currently funded at less than 5% of what they need to effectively implement their Wildlife Action Plans. Voice your support to your Congressmen and Senators! RAWA seeks to address these funding challenges and provide a new model for state wildlife conservation funding. RAWA would provide $1.3 billion nationally to state-based conservation, and $97.5 million to tribal lands, without any new taxes, to fund conservation efforts for at-risk fish & wildlife across the nation. Learn more at http://www.txwildlifealliance.org/recovering-america-s-wildlife-act.html.

SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS CROW TRIBE’S TREATY-RESERVED OFF-RESERVATION HUNTING RIGHTS

The Supreme Court has ruled that “statehood did not imply termination of reserved hunting rights, establishment of a national forest did not render an area “occupied”” and thus the case of Herrera vs. Wyoming has been settled in favor of Herrera. On Jan. 8, a former game warden for the Crow Tribe of southeastern Montana went before the United States Supreme Court. Clayvin Herrera was convicted by the State of Wyoming of killing a bull elk out of season, without a license in January 2014. Two of his companions, who also shot bulls after following the herd off the Crow Reservation across the state line into the Bighorn National Forest, both pleaded guilty to the same poaching charges and paid fines. Herrera however, has argued all the way to the highest court in the land that the 1868 Second Treaty of Fort Laramie guarantees his tribal “right to hunt on the unoccupied lands of the United States so long as game may be found thereon.”Summary and opinions: https://www.natlawreview.com/article/indian-nations-law-update-june-2019; https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/18pdf/17-532_q86b.pdf.  

LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

The House Natural Resources Committee conducted a legislative markup on H.R. 3195, the Land and Water Conservation Fund Permanent Funding Act. Earlier this year, S. 47 – the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act permanently reauthorized the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) when it was signed into law. The Making Public Lands Public initiative (MPLP) was included in S. 47. MPLP designates $15 million annually from LWCF for projects that increase public access to landlocked federal public land for sportsmen and women and other recreationists. Recent studies estimate there are nearly 10 million acres of public lands in the west that are open to hunting, fishing, recreational shooting and other outdoor activities, but the general public is currently unable to access these lands for a variety of reasons. Lack of adequate access has been cited as the main reason many people no longer participate in hunting and fishing activities. Learn more: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/3195/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22hr+3195%22%5D%7D&r=1&s=2.

Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting. HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols and legislation. Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy and legislation. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.


Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.