HSC signs onto two letters in support of Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, Land and Water Conservation Fund, Restore Our Parks Act, North American Wetlands Conservation Act, and Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act of 2019. AFWA, CSF, DU, IWLA, NWF, NWTF, PF, QF, TRCP, and WSF are original signatories.

Letter to the House can be read HERE 

Letter to the Senate can be read HERE 

American Woodcock Society * Boone and Crockett Club * California Waterfowl Association * Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation * The Conservation Fund * Delta Waterfowl Foundation * Ducks Unlimited * Houston Safari Club * Masters of Foxhounds Association * National Rifle Association * National Shooting Sports Foundation * National Wildlife Federation * National Wildlife Refuge Association * National Wild Turkey Federation * North American Falconers Association * Orion, The Hunter’s Institute * Pope and Young Club * Professional Outfitters and Guides of America * Quality Deer Management Association * Ruffed Grouse Society * Safari Club International * Whitetails Unlimited * Wild Sheep Foundation * Wildlife Management Institute *

August 30th, 2019

The Honorable David Bernhardt
Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20240

Dear Secretary Bernhardt,
The undersigned organizations, which represent hundreds of thousands of sportsmen and women conservationists, are writing to express our strong support for the creation of the Green River National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky.

Located in Henderson County, the Green River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) would restore and protect a valuable wetland complex for the benefit of migratory birds and threatened and endangered species while also creating significant opportunities for hunting, fishing and other forms of outdoor recreation.

The proposal for the Refuge, which was informed by the input and expertise of a diverse cross-section of local stakeholders, has numerous goals including:

• Establish a second national wildlife refuge fully located in Kentucky to support fish, wildlife, and habitat conservation;
• Protect and manage wetlands and bottomland forest habitats to support waterfowl, migratory birds, and threatened and endangered species;
• Provide high-quality hunting and sport fishing;
• Provide opportunities for public use and environmental education and interpretation;
• Collaborate with partners to protect and enhance biodiversity and water quality and quantity within the Ohio River and Green River watersheds, benefiting both people and wildlife; and
• Ensure healthy wildlife populations for the benefit of Kentuckians and all Americans.

The stated purpose of the refuge would be to provide habitat for migrating and wintering waterfowl, shorebirds, non-game land birds, such as neo-tropical songbirds, and bald eagles, and other birds of prey.

Establishment of the refuge would also preserve habitat for several species listed as endangered or threatened, many species of wildlife found in wetlands and bottomland hardwood forests while also providing outstanding nesting habitat for wood ducks.

The refuge would be a prime destination for many outdoor recreational activities, including waterfowl hunting, fishing, kayaking, hiking and birdwatching which would have direct positive benefits to the regional economy.

More than 55 million people visit national wildlife refuges each year generating $1.7 billion in sales and nearly 27,000 jobs for regional economies. The Green River NWR would add to Kentucky’s growing tourism industry, which generated $14.5 billion in economic impact during 2016, an increase of over five percent from $13.7 billion in 2015. In 2016 alone, tourism generated $63.5 million in direct spending in Henderson County.

For these reasons, we are united in our strong support for the establishment of the Green River National Wildlife Refuge.

Thank you in advance for your consideration of these comments and for your ongoing service on behalf of America’s sportsmen and women conservationists.

Sincerely,
American Woodcock Society
Boone and Crockett Club
California Waterfowl Association
Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation
The Conservation Fund
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
Ducks Unlimited
Houston Safari Club
Masters of Foxhounds Association
National Rifle Association
National Shooting Sports Foundation
National Wildlife Federation
National Wildlife Refuge Association
National Wild Turkey Federation
North American Falconers Association
Orion, The Hunter’s Institute
Pope and Young Club
Professional Outfitters and Guides of America
Quality Deer Management Association
Ruffed Grouse Society
Safari Club International
Whitetails Unlimited
Wild Sheep Foundation
Wildlife Management Institute

Houston, TX –Houston Safari Club (HSC) has announced the formation of a Political Action Committee (PAC).  Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting.

HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to affect policy, protocols and legislation. HSC collaborates with legislators, key opinion leaders, policy groups, professional organizations and governments at home and abroad. The HSC-PAC was established to support pro-hunting legislators, legislation, and policy.

“As the President of HSC, I am very excited that we have established the HSC-PAC” said JD Burrows. “HSC has a high level of involvement in various communities. Our expertise and legacy in hunting and conservation resonate with policy makers, and our input and opinion are often sought out by legislators”. “I call on all of those interested in hunting and wildlife conservation to get involved in the HSC-PAC”.

Hunting is our legacy. It is at the core of what we do and who we are. It has been said that you better get involved in politics or politics will dictate your future. This is especially true in the hunting community. As hunters, we have challenges on many fronts. We need to be proactive, both in fundraising and involvement. HSC can be an influencing force in the legislative community, and we need to make sure our voices are heard in Washington. To donate to the HSC-PAC and show your support the future of hunting, go to HSC-PAC.org.

HSC-PAC Disclaimer

Contributions will be used in connection with a federal election and directed to campaigns and candidates that support pro-hunting legislation and policy. Contributions are not deductible for Federal income tax purposes. In compliance with Federal law, the HSC-PAC must use its best efforts to obtain, maintain and submit the name, mailing address, occupation and name of employer of individuals whose contributions exceed $200 during an election cycle. An individual may not contribute more than a total of $5,000 per election to the HSC-PAC. Federal law prohibits contributions to the committee from the general treasury funds of a corporation, labor organizations or national banks (including corporate or other business entity credit cards), from any person contributing another’s funds, from a Federal government contractor, or from a foreign national who lacks permanent resident status.

About Houston Safari Club

Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy and legislation. HSC is dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting and supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. HSC assumes an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols and legislation, collaborating with legislators, key opinion leaders, agencies, professional organizations and governments at home and abroad. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization. Visit our website at houstonsafariclub.org or call 713.623.8844 for more information.

####

September 4, 2019

The Honorable Lisa Murkowski
Chairman Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
United States Senate

The Honorable John Barrasso
Chairman Committee on Environment and Public Works
United States Senate

the Honorable Joe Manchin
Ranking Member Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
United States Senate

The Honorable Tom Carper
Ranking Member Committee on Environment and Public Works
United States Senate

Dear Chairman Murkowski, Chairman Barrasso, Ranking Member Manchin, Ranking Member Carper,

As organizations representing millions of Americans, who hunt, fish, hike, camp, paddle, and enjoy the outdoors, we greatly appreciate the leadership that each of you provide in advancing key conservation priorities. We are especially grateful for the bipartisan passage of the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management and Recreation Act (S.47).

We write to encourage your continued strong, bipartisan support for addressing our nation’s most urgent conservation needs: recovering imperiled wildlife species, repairing our crumbling public lands infrastructure, and expanding outdoor recreational opportunities. Five bipartisan bills—the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, the Restore Our Parks (and Public Lands) Act, the Land and Water Conservation Fund Permanent Funding Act, the North American Wetlands Conservation Extension Act, and the Modernizing the Pittman Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act —will proactively address these challenges, while bolstering our nation’s $887 billion outdoor economy, which employs more than 7.6 million Americans. These five programs are fully complimentary—restoring wildlife habitat, fixing recreational infrastructure, and expanding access to America’s outdoor heritage—and together provide the foundation for conservation across America:

  1. Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (H.R. 3742): Right now, more than one-third of American wildlife species are at-risk and in need of proactive conservation action. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would accelerate the recovery of more than 12,000 “Species of Greatest Conservation Need,” as identified through existing Congressionally-mandated State Wildlife Action Plans, including species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. This legislation provides matching funds to states, territories, and tribes to enact collaborative, proactive, on-the-ground habitat restoration efforts to restore wildlife populations and prevent species from requiring protections under ESA. This collaborative, non-regulatory approach has attracted broad bipartisan support and support from a range of industries, because it will help save the full diversity of America’s fish and wildlife resources, while reducing regulatory uncertainty.
  2. Restore Our Parks (and Public Lands) Act (S.500, H.R. 1225): Maintaining roads, trails, campsites, parking lots, boat ramps, and other public lands infrastructure makes possible the millions of visits to hunt, fish, scout, hike, climb, and enjoy them. Since much recreation and most hunting and fishing occurs on non-Parks land, we recommend that the legislation also direct a small portion of the funding to maintain infrastructure at National Forests (10% of funds), National Wildlife Refuges (10%), and Bureau of Land Management lands (5%). These multiple use and wildlife-focused lands host more than 261 million visitors annually, in addition to the 331 million visitors to National Park sites. The maintenance backlog on all of our public lands should be addressed simultaneously and equitably.
  3. Land and Water Conservation Fund Permanent Funding Act (S. 1081; H.R. 3195): LWCF has helped conserve some of the most important lands in our nation for hunting, fishing, and recreating. We greatly appreciate your collective leadership in securing permanent authorization for the program earlier this year and incorporating the Making Public Lands Public provision, which requires that at least 3% of the funds be used to expand opportunities for hunting, fishing, and other sporting activities. We believe that the federal agencies should prioritize strategic easements and acquisitions, such as access parcels that help unlock the more than 9 million acres of currently inaccessible public lands; inholdings and parcels adjacent to existing units that will improve landscape management and reduce operating costs; and parcels that will help improve the resilience of natural systems and reduce damage to local communities, such as forests parcels near the wildlands-urban interface that would help mitigate catastrophic megafires, wetlands or inland riparian corridors that reduce flood risks, and headwaters that provide water storage capacity and mitigate drought conditions. Permanent, dedicated funding for LWCF will ensure that communities across the country can predictably leverage resources to grow their local outdoor economy by expanding hunting, fishing, and other recreational opportunities and conserving important wildlife habitat.
  4. North American Wetlands Conservation Extension Act (S.261, H.R. 925): For the past thirty years, NAWCA has produced economic and environmental benefits, while conserving wetlands that support America’s fish and wildlife resources. More than 5,600 conservation partners from small landowners to large corporations have teamed up on 2,644 NAWCA projects to positively affect over 33.4 million acres of habitat. Through the history of the program, NAWCA projects have been implemented in all 50 states. In addition to protecting wildlife habitat, this program improves water quality and generates local revenue by increasing tourism through enhanced outdoor recreation opportunities. This program also creates on average, nearly 7,500 new jobs annually, generating more than $200 million in worker earnings each year.
  5. Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act (S.2092, H.R. 877): The Pittman-Robertson Fund is a vital funding source for the conservation of wild birds and mammals, but it lacks a mechanism to sustain and grow the number of sportsmen and sportswomen who fund it through the payment of user excise taxes. This bipartisan bill will authorize the use of a portion of the funding for Basic Hunter Education and Safety under Pittman-Robertson (P-R) for state fish and wildlife agencies to recruit, retain and reactivate hunters and recreational shooters. This bill provides parity between P-R and Dingell-Johnson programs and would enable state fish and wildlife agencies the flexibility to communicate with sportsmen and sportswomen more effectively, an approach which has demonstrated proven results in increasing participation in angling and boating efforts.

We strongly encourage Congress to prioritize enactment of these critical conservation programs and fully fund them with dedicated revenues. By enacting these interrelated pieces of legislation, we can grow America’s outdoor economy and ensure America’s public lands and wildlife heritage endure for the enjoyment and benefit of current and future generations.

Thank you for your commitment to conservation.

Sincerely,

American Woodcock Society
Archery Trade Association
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies
Camp Fire Club of America
Catch-A-Dream Foundation
Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation
Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting Sports
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
Ducks Unlimited
Houston Safari Club
Izaak Walton League of America
Masters of Foxhounds Association
Mule Deer Foundation
National Association of Forest Service Retirees
National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative
National Wild Turkey Federation
National Wildlife Federation
North American Falconers Association
North American Grouse Partnership
Orion – The Hunter’s Institute
Pheasants Forever, Inc.
Pope and Young Club
Quail Forever
Quality Deer Management Association
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Ruffed Grouse Society
Sportsmen’s Alliance
Texas Wildlife Association
The Conservation Fund
The Wildlife Society
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership
Whitetails Unlimited
Wild Sheep Foundation
Wildlife Forever
Wildlife Management Institute

SUPPORT PROP 5! VOTE YES FOR THE NOVEMBER 2019 TEXAS CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

In November, a Texas constitutional amendment will appear on the ballot. A simple majority vote will appropriate the revenues from sales tax on sporting goods equipment to fund state parks and historical sites. Sen. Lois Kolkhorst of Brenham and Rep. John Cyrier of Bastrop, with the approval of Governor Abbott, led the Texas Legislature to pass bills calling for the constitutional vote. Between 1993 and 2017, the state’s sporting goods sales tax has generated between $60 million and $165 million annually for a total of $2.5 billion. During that time, only 40% percent of the funding found its way into the budgets of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department or the Texas Historical Commission as intended. Many citizens incorrectly assume the taxes they pay on sporting goods were fully allocated to support parks, not realizing that significant portions of the Sporting Goods Sales Tax are diverted to other purposes. TPWD operates 95 parks and historical sites of its own around the state. The system covers more than 630,000 acres and attracts almost 10 million visitors annually. Its 2019 budget is $86 million, $60 million of which comes from its current share of the sporting goods sales tax. TPWD has been faced with many challenges and needed repairs as a result of severe weather and flooding over the past several years (in the last 10 years, TPWD has experienced more than $100 million in flood damage to park’s facilities around the state), in addition to the expenses required to routinely maintain Texas state parks. If approved, the amendment would authorize 94% of the revenue to TPWD’s parks and historical sites and 6% to sites under the Texas Historical Commission.

SUPPORT RECOVERING AMERICA’S WILDLIFE ACT: H.R. 3742

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act has been introduced in the U.S. House by Representatives Dingell (D-MI-12) and Fortenberry (R-NE-01). This bipartisan legislation establishes a 21st Century funding model for the proactive conservation of fish and wildlife. This legislation redirects $1.3 billion annually in existing revenues to state fish and wildlife agencies to implement their science-driven wildlife action plans, and an additional $97.5 million to tribal wildlife managers to conserve species on tribal lands and waters. This funding will ensure those with a proven track record of success in species conservation and recovery can proactively conserve at-risk fish and wildlife in a voluntary, non-regulatory manner.  

SUPPORT MODERNIZING THE PITTMAN-ROBERTSON FUND FOR TOMORROW’S NEEDS ACT

Another very important bill has been reintroduced in the 116th Congress-the Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act. The Pittman-Robertson Act directs excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment to be used for wildlife conservation purposes. Since its origin in 1937, this legislation has contributed nearly $11.5 billion to wildlife conservation. This legislation would provide funding to state wildlife agencies for the recruitment, retention, and reactivation of hunters and recreational shooters (R3) through educational programs.   

SUPPORT SAVES ACT

Introduced by U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) the Saving America’s Vulnerable and Endangered Species (SAVES) Act, would eliminate bureaucratic red tape for ranchers and conservators engaged in captive breeding of exotic wildlife and support animal conservation efforts. Sen. Cruz said. “Non-native species and wildlife enrich Texas land and are an important economic driver. I am proud to reintroduce the SAVES Act to eliminate bureaucratic regulations and empower Texans to engage in a sustainable use of resources while supporting their wildlife breeding and conservation efforts.”

OPPOSE THE PASSAGE OF H.R. 2245: THE CONSERVING ECOSYSTEMS BY CEASING THE IMPORTATION OF LARGE ANIMALS TROPHIES ACT

HSC was an original signer and has joined forces with 31 other conservation organizations to oppose this piece of legislation. This bill represents an ill-conceived attempt to substitute uninformed prejudices for the management strategies of the wildlife authorities successfully conserving the world’s largest populations of lions, elephants and other African species in their range countries. If implemented, H.R. 2245 would undermine some of the most effective strategies for conserving the world’s wildlife.  

SUPPORT HR 837: CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE TRANSMISSION STUDY FUNDING

HR 837, sponsored by U.S. Representatives Ralph Abraham (R-La.) and Marc Veasey (D-Texas), calls for a collaboration between the Secretaries of Agriculture and Interior to work with the National Academies of Science to “study and identify the ways CWD is transmitted between wild, captive and farmed” deer, caribou, elk and moose.

OPPOSE PEBBLE MINE

Pebble Mine is proposed to be built in the headwaters of Bristol Bay, Alaska. Bristol Bay’s world-renowned sockeye salmon fishery is valued at over $1.5 billion, supports over 14,000 jobs, and sustains more than 30 regional Alaska Native Tribes. The proposed Pebble Mine would be over 1,500 feet deep by 6,500 feet wide, covering 3,190 acres – all in the headwaters of the world’s largest salmon fishery. On February 20, 2019 the US Army Corps of Engineers released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Pebble Mine. Due to a 30-day extension announced on May 3rd, public comments on the draft EIS were accepted until July 1, 2019. During the period when the draft EIS was out for public comment, several public hearings were held to receive public input on the proposed mine. In July 2019, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that they would not block the proposed Pebble Mine. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is in the process of reviewing all submitted public comments on the draft EIS and preparing a final EIS. The final EIS is expected to be released in early 2020 and a decision on the project will be announced in mid-2020.

HSC APPLAUDS U.S. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR BERNHARDT’S ACTION TO EXPAND PUBLIC ACCESS TO HUNTING & FISHING

Through efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David has announced new hunting and fishing opportunities on more than 1.4 million acres nationwide. The expansion included in the rule is more than double the acreage that has been opened or expanded compared to the last 5 years combined. Seventy-seven national wildlife refuges and 15 national fish hatcheries managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are incorporated in the new rule and are now open to hunting and fishing for the first time or have expanded opportunities for new game species. This action will now bring the number of units in the Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System where the public may hunt to 381 and the number where fishing will be permitted to 316. In addition, this will formally open lands on 15 hatcheries of the National Fish Hatchery System to hunting and/or sport fishing for the first time. The final rule also outlines a comprehensive revision and simplification of all refuge-specific hunting and fishing regulations in all 50 states to more closely match state regulations while continuing to ensure safe and compatible opportunities. 

Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting. HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols and legislation. Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy and legislation. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.

NOVEMBER 2019 TEXAS CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

In November, a Texas constitutional amendment will appear on the ballot. A simple majority vote will appropriate the revenues from sales tax on sporting goods equipment to fund state parks and historical sites. Sen. Lois Kolkhorst of Brenham and Rep. John Cyrier of Bastrop, with the approval of Governor Abbott, led the Texas Legislature to pass bills calling for the constitutional vote. Between 1993 and 2017, the state’s sporting goods sales tax has generated between $60 million and $165 million annually for a total of $2.5 billion. During that time, only 40% percent of the funding found its way into the budgets of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department or the Texas Historical Commission as intended. Many citizens incorrectly assume the taxes they pay on sporting goods were fully allocated to support parks, not realizing that significant portions of the Sporting Goods Sales Tax are diverted to other purposes. TPWD operates 95 parks and historical sites of its own around the state. The system covers more than 630,000 acres and attracts almost 10 million visitors annually. Its 2019 budget is $86 million, $60 million of which comes from its current share of the sporting goods sales tax. TPWD has been faced with many challenges and needed repairs as a result of severe weather and flooding over the past several years (in the last 10 years, TPWD has experienced more than $100 million in flood damage to park’s facilities around the state), in addition to the expenses required to routinely maintain Texas state parks. If approved, the amendment would authorize 94% of the revenue to TPWD’s parks and historical sites and 6% to sites under the Texas Historical Commission.

RECOVERING AMERICA’S WILDLIFE ACT: H.R. 3742

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act has been introduced in the U.S. House by Representatives Dingell (D-MI-12) and Fortenberry (R-NE-01). This bipartisan legislation establishes a 21st Century funding model for the proactive conservation of fish and wildlife. This legislation redirects $1.3 billion annually in existing revenues to state fish and wildlife agencies to implement their science-driven wildlife action plans, and an additional $97.5 million to tribal wildlife managers to conserve species on tribal lands and waters. This funding will ensure those with a proven track record of success in species conservation and recovery can proactively conserve at-risk fish and wildlife in a voluntary, non-regulatory manner. For more information: https://houstonsafariclub.org/hsc-legislative-alert/.

MODERNIZING THE PITTMAN-ROBERTSON FUND FOR TOMORROW’S NEEDS ACT

Another very important bill has been reintroduced in the 116th Congress-the Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act. The Pittman-Robertson Act directs excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment to be used for wildlife conservation purposes. Since its origin in 1937, this legislation has contributed nearly $11.5 billion to wildlife conservation. This legislation would provide funding to state wildlife agencies for the recruitment, retention, and reactivation of hunters and recreational shooters (R3) through educational programs. For more information: http://congressionalsportsmen.org/policies/federal/modernizing-the-pittman-robertson-fund.

OPPOSE THE PASSAGE OF H.R. 2245: THE CONSERVING ECOSYSTEMS BY CEASING THE IMPORTATION OF LARGE ANIMALS TROPHIES ACT.

HSC was an original signer and has joined forces with 31 other conservation organizations to oppose this piece of legislation. This bill represents an ill-conceived attempt to substitute uninformed prejudices for the management strategies of the wildlife authorities successfully conserving the world’s largest populations of lions, elephants and other African species in their range countries. If implemented, H.R. 2245 would undermine some of the most effective strategies for conserving the world’s wildlife. Read the full letter HERE

Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting. HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols and legislation. Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy and legislation. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.